A journey from creation to situation

collections, Making, Public Art
Hammer Head

Hammer Head. Only Human Collection. Sam Shendi 2017

On Saturday in the early hours of the morning, the sculptor set off to take a number of sculptures down to St.Botolph’s building in Aldgate, London. It’s a long journey there and back in one day and it takes it out of him each time. The sculptures will be  on display for 6 months and dominating the reception area of this modern building.

Some people use only their heads to plough on through, working hard, determined to make a difference. They use their heads for work. It’s quite appropriate then that this sits inside the reception for a Law firm.

hammer head in lon 3hammer head london2Hammer h in london

preparing the hammer head

It is easy to forget once they are inside an industrial building that these sculptures are all hand carved by my husband, it’s so ‘perfect’ looking, with today’s modern industry where things are moulded and formed by machines. My husband’s  philosophy is that art should be beautiful, he has such skill with his hands and traditional sculpture methods which makes me believe he is one of the classic sculptors in our time and we are working to get him known for that. Behind each piece is a philosophy, a story.

The sculptures themsleves go on such a journey from creation, being in the studio, photo shoots and they look different being placed in the ‘outside world’ rather than being in the studio. These have had such a fantastic response on social media which affirms how these works should be out in the public arena wherever possible.

We are all on that journey. From the start, to where we will end up and how we will tunnel our way along. Laid back with no ambition? Meandering along life’s twists turns? Or like a hammer in a relentless and repetitive rhythm to achieve the end result. It is a journey in the making from creation to situation.

To go and view these pieces you can get in touch with info@ARTful.org.uk.

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Stuck? How to make a decision?

collections, Colour

 

Spilt decision

Split Decisions (Front view)

This piece could in some ways symbolise me, we all can relate to the position of not being able to make a choice when both options seem as bright and positive. How do we make that choice?

split decision from back

Split Decision (back view)

We can get stuck in the middle, in the dark black blue centre. Each pathway seeming viable and having pro’s. To be indecisive though can be paralysing and we live in a world with too much choice and a plethora of options. We have to get better at listening to our heart.

I used to get into this dilemma even at a place to eat when there is choice.  I have found it so hard to make decisions but now, much better at listening to myself. I can see it in my eldest son too who finds it hard making a decision when faced with lots of options. We try to teach him that he needs to make a choice and then assess whether it was a good one or not for him so that next time it might be easier. My youngest son is more like the sculptor, some how has a stronger instinct on what they want whether out be right for them or not. A natural gut feeling. The sculptor has been using this expression a lot recent, in fact we had to it out from a video we have had recorded of his latest collection where he used it several time (video coming soon).

We are human, we can feel one thing in one moment and another in a next. We are human beings, full of contradictions. If we do spend time and connect, listen to what our inner voice is telling us then it can be a little bit easier to make a decision. Deep down we do know what we want. The noise and confusion of life sometimes cloaks us in a veil of insecurity about the direction we need to follow.

This piece is very much like a yoga pose, in fact a lot of the sculptures could almost be yoga positions. I have just come to the end of a 30 day yoga journey with Yoga with Adriene. Would highly recommend it for helping to connect with yourself and who you are. Ultimately this helps to make better choices, decisions more in keeping with our own path.

Split decisiosn from side

 

Wrapping up 2017 and Moving Forward

collections, Colour, Soul searching
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‘Moving Forward’ @Sam Shendi part of The Only Human Collection

2017 began literally with a disappointing New Year’s Eve event for the sculptor followed with tragic news in the first week of January. I am ending the year with a cold-flu-cough that has lasted near on three weeks and a year which has flown by without a sense of much achieved personally. It has in all been a strange year, one where I have discovered things which I am hoping will steer me into a clearer direction in the new year. So I am starting 2018 with a totally new approach. Goal setting, time planning and organisation. Looking into 2018 with hope and my focus word for the year; Purposeful.

Each year I think I have been looking forward but staying in exactly the same spot. Cue sculpture,’Moving Forward’, similar to  the last sculpture I wrote about ‘Awkward’, somehow defies gravity and plays with it so that you think it might fall. Yet stable and unmoving, we can be like this, think we are progressing when really we a stuck in exactly the same place.

Despite feeling unhealthy and a little bit overwhelmed at how little I have done over the last few weeks I am determined not to let that affect my resolve to achieving my goals. I am hopeful that setting goals will be more purposeful than a resolution.

Let us all make 2018 a year of change, progression and moving forward. Wishing you a happy and purposeful 2018.

That’s a bit awkward

collections, Relationships

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This piece sums up my three Shendi boys who all have tendencies to lean towards being awkward rather than compliant. I think I am compliant. So why am I surrounded by the ‘awkward’? But when does awkward become just being yourself? Should we have to tip ourselves towards someone else’s preference just to make things easier or more comfortable for ourselves or for them?.

My husband made this piece in the knowledge that he can be awkward. Meaning that he has very clear ideas, things are nearly always black and white to him. Often that doesn’t always fit in with those around you. In some ways that is easy to deal with, you know where you are or what a person’s preferences are. Sometimes it is just difficult. The piece itself looks difficult, defining gravity it makes you feel a little bit awkward looking at it. Yet it is still stunning and the fact that it does balance is the genius of the sculptor. I guess being awkward has it’s trade offs.

If you are easy either way about something it can be more straightforward to fit in with those around you but you can easily then drift along not really doing what you really want to do. As you can tell I have no black and white idea on which is the better way to be. Perhaps, that ultimately is the point. We should be more accepting of others opinions, ideas and view points without having to have them agree with us in order to get along. I have found this very interesting in living with someone who often has a very different viewpoint from myself. Either because he does or he’s just being awkward!

 

Fall.

collections, Colour, Public Art

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This is the first piece in the ‘Only Human‘ collection, ‘Falling into the past’, which looks a little like a yoga pose and one which is very good for opening up your heart space. Below the images shows the red section in that heart space area of the body. Sometimes we need to let go of whatever it is we are holding onto so tightly in order to feel lighter once again.

Fall, feels like such an Americanism but in recent years we have really started to use it here in the UK. I think it is the artists season, the colours, the light, the contrast and the imagery. I recently saw the quote that Autumn is, “natures way of showing is that we need to let go.” We do need to develop an art of letting go, materially and emotionally. It can be a real struggle, we hold on to things unnecessarily. The Buddha said, ‘the root of all suffering is attachment. We can attach ourselves to time, place, people, objects.

In my rough notes for writing this post I have ‘time travelling and Harry potter’ scribbled down which I am not quite sure where I was going with that. Probably something to do with finishing ‘The Cursed Child’ with my eldest which really used the idea of time travel and perhaps I had thought ‘Falling into the past’ had some connection but any deep meaning has escaped me.

This sculpture for me represents the feet firmly placed in the past, the head in the future. The heart space is in the here and now and there we can rest and let go.

Fall

Oh leaves

so gently falling,

drifting to the ground

whilst we stand firm

and dig in our heels,

so proud.

Let us look,

to nature

to learn what we are shown

that change is essential

to become fully grown

so let go 

let’s flow

as we become lighter

brighter 

new ideas are sown.

Oh leaves

so gently drifting

let us learn to be

like the autumn fall

new colours for all to see.

 

 

We are only human after all

collections, Colour, Relationships

Most of the work my husband sculpts forms part of a collection, a group of sculptures under the same title. The latest finished collection is, “Only Human”, born from ideas taken from human phrases. Phrases we use in conversation that has then shaped the form of these vessels. Human beings are fallible, we are not perfect and we can only strive for improving ourselves.  Always  makes me think of the song, “Human” by Rag’n’bone, as the boys did a Viking song based on the rhythm and we had the song going around our head constantly. ” We are only human after all, don’t put your blame on me.” Human beings are no longer a subject of focus on a daily basis and in many ways have become devalued. Alex Rodgers wrote a book with the same name about the current issues and problems young people face in today’s society.

Each sculpture is created as a human figure whilst simultaneously acting like a canvas which if stretched out would give you an abstract colourful painting, showing that emotion has a colourful impact on human energy and action. These pieces are a frozen body movement which has been shaped by the emotion to allow you to understand that each one of them is only a presentation of who you are. The colour e describes the emotion hidden within the piece and is a completion of the actual concept. Our emotions are so powerful, if we look back at the past mankind uses this emotion to direct not just thousands but millions.

All these pieces have been hand carved using various materials and then painted. Many people can have a create talent, they can draw, paint, take a photography or work with clay or wood. It is something again to bring something out from an imagination of an idea or concept and one in which you are telling a story. In an attempt to be more organised the next series of blog posts I will go through each one in turn, but for now you can think of your own  titles for the pieces.

Only Human. Sam Shendi. 2017.


Shendi sculptures are ‘essentialism’

Making, Old Masters

When writing blurbs or bits and pieces for galleries, agents and articles we often describe my husband’s work as minimal, referencing the sixties minimalistic movement and stripping the human form down to the bare essentials.

In my own recent quest for minimising the home, trying to contain our family in a small northern English terrace house, I discovered Greg McKeown’s book “Essentialism, The Disciplined Pursuit of Less.” Just a few pages in it dawned on me that, the way of the essentialist, is very much the way of the sculptor. ‘The relentless pursuit of less but better. It doesn’t mean occasionally giving a nod to the principle. It means pursuing it in a disciplined way”.

Originating from Aristotle, the term ‘essentialism’ is the idea that everything has an essential nature to it. Plato, too was one of the first essentialists, believing in the concept of ideal forms.

Our youngest has asked a few times, “Why don’t you do arms Baba”. The sculptor answers making the point that they aren’t necessary. I have heard him speak about how Egyptian sculpture lasted longer than Roman sculpture because there were no weak points. An almost ideal form that could remain. Roman sculpture today stands without arms because they have been lost to the elements where as the ancient Egyptians made no gaps between arm and torso. The Egyptians knew what was essential but also had a style that would remain in tact. It is in the taking away that more is added, and in this case time.

Not only does my husband sculpt in an essentialist way I feel he lives his life to that aim. He lives by design (pardon the pun)  perhaps it goes hand in hand, he is so ruthless in his pursuit of sculpting and because he is not yet a full-time artist his time has to be used to purposefully. He has a, “disciplined, systematic approach for determining where his highest point of contribution lies, and then his execution of these things appear to be almost effortless”. That effortlessness makes it easy to think that it is un-challenging or un-demanding and consequently, I become forgetful of how hard he works.

In this journey from realism to the minimal my husband’s work takes away all that is not essential to the story he is telling. “An Essentialist thinks almost everything is non-essential”. For the pieces are like three-dimensional stories in a very contemporary, minimal form. Play is an important part of our development because it doesn’t just help us to explore what is essential. It is essential in and of itself. My husband’s work is playful in the use of colour but also the shapes and themes which are provoked.

‘The essential life is living a life that really matters, a life lived without regret. If you have correctly identified what really matters, if you invest your tie and energy in it then it is difficult to regret the choice you make. You become proud of the life you have chosen to live.”

In short, I think Sam Shendi is up there as one living an essential life and consequently his master pieces mould into an art movement of Essentialism. Then of course I should say, it is essential that they are seen, that the work is viewed and appreciated by the many. This is what the sculptor is working so hard to achieve.

Getting back into a routine and flow

Colour, Connections, Public Art

Apparently it is 2 months since I last posted and I have been very aware of that fact but I just haven’t been able to sit down and write. It was the summer months with the boys off school and other things seem to have taken over in my to-do list. So I have slowly been getting back into my routine but still need to be a bit more productive when it comes to blogging! I have been a little too preoccupied with Instagram which I have just discovered, although haven’t completely got my head around it yet. I have also done lots of interesting reading. In one book which I will relate to more in my next post (see getting a bit organised!) the chapter opening is entitled, ‘Flow. The Genius of Routine. Routine , in an intelligent man, is a sign of ambition -W.H. Auden.  Although, generally my husband I would describe is not quite a creature of habit as am I but when it comes to the studio he definitely is in a routine and it pays off. Over the summer the following pieces went to new homes:

Defeated Butterflies, in his new home in Johannesburg

‘The Wedding Dress’ in her new home in Johannesburg

 

 

‘The King and Queen’, in their new home in SouthSea

‘Witnesses’ in the entrance to the Tennis Club in South-sea

Press Article in South Africa

 

In conversation with….

Exhibitions, Galleries

Heads together

Connections, Relationships, Soul searching
heads-and-sculptor

‘The rough collection’ (2016) Sam Shendi

My husband seems to be able to tap into some subliminal subconscious web of communication. There have been several times where he has been working on something which parallels what is happening else where.

These heads were created at the end of last year. Usually working to a smooth, perfected finish these pieces are the opposite. Rough and ready to represent the experiences in life that leave a mark and shape us. Entitled; ‘Mr Green’, ‘Mr Blue’, ‘Mr White’, ‘Mr Red’ and ‘Mr Grey’, colours often symbolising mood, emotion, feelings, expressions. I have put this image with the sculptor in the scene to show the scale of them. As a group, ‘Head’s together’ which yesterday I stumbled across is a campaign, http://www.headstogether.org.uk ,which is spearheaded by Prince Harry and the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. It is raising the awareness of “unresolved mental problems” and “wants to help people feel much more comfortable with their everyday mental wellbeing and have the practical tools to support their friends and family.”

sketch

Sketch by Sam Shendi

mr-blue

Mr Blue (2016) Sam Shendi

I thought it would be interesting to show a sketch and sculpture together for a change. I love seeing the lines on paper and then the shift into three dimensions. The bird symbolises the idea of voices or the noise pecking away at the mind.

Mental health has huge stigma, often misunderstood and a reoccurring theme in my husband’s work partly I think because of his increasing awareness of how much it was hidden and not spoken of growing up in rural Egypt. It’s the same here in the UK but with media and celebrities speaking out it is something being uncovered and discussed more and more. It would appear it is a global issue on the rise of being discussed. Again, these pieces show a visual story. A visual interpretation of a subject, theme, idea which we all have connection with an experience of, a shared similarity beyond the differences of culture, class, education, gender.